Friends of the Bill Williams River and Havasu National Wildlife Refuges

The USF&WS website for the Bill Williams River National Wildlife Refuge can be found at this link: 


Bill Williams River NWR


The USF&WS's new website for the Havasu National Wildlife Refuge can be found here:


Havasu NWR
Our Refuges

The U.S.  Fish & Wildlife Service's Lake Havasu National Wildlife Refuge Complex consists of two distinct Refuges, the  Bill Williams River National Wildlife Refuge, and it's counterpart, the Havasu National Wildlife Refuge; both Refuges are located in the lower Colorado River valley of western Arizona.

The southernmost of the two Refuges, the Bill Williams River NWR, is located between Lake Havasu City and Parker (approximately 24 miles south of Lake Havasu City). The "Bill Will", as it is affectionately referred to by it's many fans, is located on the extreme southern end of Lake Havasu. This Refuge encompasses a portion of Lake Havasu, as well as the Bill Williams River riparian habitat, which offers one of the last stands of cottonwood-willow forest along the lower Colorado River. Find out more about the Bill Williams NWR by going HERE

The northernmost of the two Refuges, the Havasu NWR, is located between Lake Havasu City, Arizona and Needles, California; Interstate 40 passes through this Refuge as it crosses the Colorado River. The Havasu NWR includes approximately 300 shoreline miles of river, lake, and marsh habitat bewtween Lake Havasu City and Needles. The Topock Marsh is located north of the Interstate 40 crossing; Topock Gorge and the Havasu Wilderness Area are located south of the Interstate 40 crossing. Topock Marsh, Topock Gorge, and the Havasu Wilderness Area are all distinct attractions in their own right. Find out more about the Havasu NWR by going HERE

Both Refuges are home to an amazing variety of migratory and resident wildlife, and offer the opportunity to experience wonderful recreational opportunities!​

Bill Williams River NWR Weather